Music Department Hosts “60’s” Choir Concert

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AneUhnu Gwatidzo sings his solo in "The Rhythm of Life" during the dress rehearsal for the "Welcome to the 60's" concert. Photo by Lauren Anderle

AneUhnu Gwatidzo sings his solo in “The Rhythm of Life” during the dress rehearsal for the “Welcome to the 60’s” concert. Photo by Lauren Anderle

The Snow College music department hosted a choir concert called “Welcome to the 60’s” on Oct. 13. While most of the music was from the 1960’s, some of the songs were from the 1860’s.  Even though most of the songs were from the same time period, there was much variety as they were selected from films, pop genre, and Broadway plays.  Not only were multiple choirs performing, but also Snow College’s commercial music ensemble.

“The great thing about the 1960’s is that it was an era that was alive with energy that was generated by college students,” said Professor Michael Huff, director of the concert.  “I thought it would really be a good fit, on a college campus, to do a concert of music from the 1960’s, because it was the students who drove the peace movement, the antiwar movement, who really drove the civil rights movement.  They were behind so many of the really positive things.”

The concert opened with a song called “Welcome to the 60’s” from the Broadway musical and film, Hairspray.  Also performed was music from Mary PoppinsThe Sound of Music, Sweet Charity, and Memphis.

Some of the musical numbers even included choreography, differing from a typical choir concert. “With a rock and roll concert, like this 60’s concert, it’s important to not be a typical singer and just stand on stage, but you have to be moving around,” said Olivia Robinson, choir member and assistant.

The audience included many people, both family and students. “I felt the emotion behind it and loved the feeling,” said Emily Goates, a student of Snow College.  “Just kind of made my heart happy.  Like, I don’t know how else to describe it.”

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