Culture Corner – Asia’s Far East

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Spending time with our international students can be a blast. Snow as many students from various  countries throughout the world. Back Row: Ka Hei Ung (Macau), Danni Choi (Macau), Edison (Macau)  and Maho Hatton (Japan). Front Row: Sayaka Yamauchi (Japan), Akane Tsuchiuchi (Japan), Colton  Welch (United States), and Cho Ian Lam (China). Photo by Emily Gordon.

Spending time with our international students can be a blast. Snow as many students from various
countries throughout the world. Back Row: Ka Hei Ung (Macau), Danni Choi (Macau), Edison (Macau)
and Maho Hatton (Japan). Front Row: Sayaka Yamauchi (Japan), Akane Tsuchiuchi (Japan), Colton
Welch (United States), and Cho Ian Lam (China). Photo by Emily Gordon.

Culture Corner brings to light the perspectives of our international students on American culture and
their own culture. Students from Far East Asia share their thoughts in this issue.
1. “What parts of your own culture do you like most?”
Maho Hattori, a freshman student from Japan, likes that Japan is a safe country with a low crime rate.
She also likes the transportation system there. Akane Tsuchiuchi, also a freshman from Japan, misses
the food, especially sushi and udon (a type of noodle). For Ian Ho, a Chinese sophomore, his country’s
long and distinguished history is important. Chinese history sure is long; written records from China
extend back over 4,000 years! Edison Lam, a sophomore from Macau, a semi-autonomous island
governed by China, likes the fact that tourists from all parts of the world come to his city. “My city is
amazing!” he says.
2. “What do you like about America and American culture?”
Maho and Akane both enjoy being in America’s great outdoors. Edison agrees, saying it was really
exciting to see some of America’s wildlife. Akane mentioned how friendly and open Americans are,
whereas Asians tend to be introverted. Ian likes that Americans are able to own guns, which are
prohibited in China.
3. “What challenges have you experienced adjusting to life in America and at Snow College?”
Most of the interviewed students agreed that speaking English with Americans was a major challenge.
Edison says he has missed campus events because he didn’t understand what was going on. Sayaka
Uenishi, a Japanese freshman, says talking with American students is hard because a lot of them talk so
fast. It’s also hard for some of them to keep up in class during lectures.
Many of the students also miss food from home. Maho is always glad for an opportunity to shop at the
Asian food markets in the Provo area so she can cook Japanese dishes. She also says lots of American
foods are too sweet, a sentiment shared by many Asians.
4. What things from your culture would you like to share with your fellow students?
Many of the students expressed a desire to share traditional cuisines with their American classmates.
The author enjoyed a meal over the summer with two Taiwanese students at Snow Dragon, Ephraim’s
local Chinese restaurant, where the students ordered from a Chinese menu featuring authentic dishes.
Any students lucky enough to make friends with the Chinese students might have a similar opportunity
to try Chinese food. Many of the Asian students cook and would be quite pleased to share a meal with
their classmates.

Colton Welch is a sophomore student pursuing a Communications Major, and has been writing for the Snowdrift since Fall 2014. He has experience writing on Politics and Opinion, as well as International Spotlights. He has traveled to Asia and loves the Asian culture. With all of his experience, he wants to pursue a career in Political Journalism. Colton enjoys playing the guitar and working with metal and leather, making homemade armor to use in live-action roleplaying games (LARP).

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