Snow College EMT Program

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Tyler Harper, Payton Christensen, Kyle Christiansen, and Anna Boynton practice strapping each other to a backboard in EMT class. Photo by Haley Christiansen

Tyler Harper, Payton Christensen, Kyle Christiansen, and Anna Boynton practice strapping each other to a backboard in EMT class. Photo by Haley Christiansen

On Saturday April 16, 2016, twenty-two students in the Snow College EMT program were tested in practical exams that determined whether or not they would be recommended to become nationally certified emergency medical technicians.

“All semester we have been prepared to handle emergency situations, and the final practical exams solidified our preparedness.” Explained Kyle Christiansen, a sophomore at Snow College.

Kyle continued, “Over spring break I witnessed an incident where an elderly man was severely bleeding, and it was a good feeling knowing I was prepared to help him if it were necessary.”

EMTs in rural areas are often volunteers who have regular day jobs, but set aside their spare time to serve and protect their communities. Snow College provides a program that trains students, as well as local citizens, to become emergency responders.

“Although I do not plan on working as a full time EMT, it gives me peace of mind knowing I could help someone in need if the situation ever arose and I plan to work as a volunteer in my community.” Explained Payton Christiansen, a soon-to-be graduate of the Snow College EMT course.

For some, taking this class is an opportunity to serve and protect their community, for others, it is a small step in a long journey of life-saving medicine.

Rett Cook, a freshman at Snow College, took the course as a step leading to a career in emergency medicine.

”This course has given me a taste of what medicine will be like and gave me some good exposure into a future working as an emergency physician.” Explained Rett.

Students taking the semester long EMT course learn how to treat patients who suffer from traumatic, psychological, environmental, and medical emergencies. Some students, who have a bit of experience, took the class for more exposure.

“I work as a lifeguard here at Snow,” explained Anna Boynton, “so I had experience with some first aid. I mostly took this course to get an edge in a nursing career, I would like to possibly pursue a career in emergency medicine.”

After the students pass the national practical exam, which tests their abilities to properly treat patients in emergency situations, they are recommended by the instructor to take a national written exam, whereupon passing they become certified EMTs and, from there, serve their communities in a variety of ways.

Haley Christiansen is the Editor-in-Chief for The Snowdrift. She has two years of experience writing for The Snowdrift and three years’ experience writing for her high school’s newspaper before that. She worked in editing as well as layout and design of the newspaper. Haley is a social science major and plans to go into secondary education.

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